Bazar in Sana´a

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members and Dear Yemenfriends,


once again you are invited to visit our homepage for an authentic report from Sana´a instead of a newsletter. Nouria managed to organise a successful bazaar. It is a heart-warming proof that the Yemenis do not give in despite the ever more miserable political situation. Please enjoy the photos and let us hope together that it will be possible in a near future to send such products also to Austria!


Kindest regards


Anisa

Posted in Allgemein, Newsletter

Enjoyable news from the womenshelter

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members Dear Yemen Friends !

For more than ten years FELIX ARABIA INTERNATIONAL has been supporting the Women´s Shelter in Sana´a. As a result of a very friendly relationship with the 1 % Development Fund at the VIC in the framework of my German lessons for the UNWG we could, for the fourth time running, transmit a generous donation and the delighted ladies now profit from a first class PC training. Please do enjoy the charming photos with me.

Kindest regards,
Anisa

Posted in Allgemein, Newsletter

Ramadan 2021

Dear Sponsors, Members and Yemenfriends:

Nouia succeeded to compile RAMADAN presents, depending on the size of the household, for all children and their families, display them in all the rooms and distribute them immediately.
Many thanks again for your donations and please enjoy the photos!
Anisa

Posted in Newsletter

The Graduation ceremony of 50 women and girls

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members, Dear Yemenfriends,

Over the past days almost all media have reported on President Biden´s endeavours to end the war in Yemen but concrete details are missing.
We therefor forward a very positive report on

„The Graduation ceremony of 50 women and girls“
Dear All , Please find attached the photos of the ceremony of the  end of the course on the preserving the ancient Yemeni heritage that was hold and done under the auspices of the British Council. We set up a fashion show for the ancient dress of most regions of Yemen and distributed certificates and bonuses to all, it was a great day and a wonderful ceremony, we wanted to share with you  this great event and to show you that in all the bad circumstance of the hard life and the war something wonderful can come out. We are grateful to you all for supporting us and helping us Thank you so much.
Best Nouria Nagi

instead of an Easter message with all good wishes for an optimum possible pleasant feast with virusfree eggs!
Kindest regards
Anisa

Posted in Newsletter

From the News

Dear Members, Dear Sponsors, Dear Jemenfriends,

instead of a Newsletter today at shortest notice an article taken from the New York Times:

In ending American support for offensive Saudi operations in Yemen’s civil war — which he said had “created a humanitarian and strategic catastrophe” — Mr. Biden is delivering on a campaign promise, days after his administration announced a review of major U.S. arms sales to Riyadh that were approved by the Trump administration. The U.S. has also provided intelligence, targeting data and logistical support for the Saudi intervention. Mr. Biden said he would work to revive dormant peace talks and announced the appointment of a special envoy for Yemen

Posted in Allgemein

News from Nouria

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members,

Nouria could buy and distribute school material and food for all children thanks to your contributions and has asked me to thank all of you.
And, please do enter your E- Mail address in the box to the right above, for you to receive all NLs automatically.

Kindest Regards
Anisa

Posted in Allgemein

Newsletter 33

For once a report about a positive development in Yemen, where everywhere else the horrible war continues:

‘Marib Model’

Over the years, Marib’s local government has developed its own strategy to provide security and stability for the province’s population, driven by well-respected and capable leaders, empowered by national decentralisation, providing Marib with an unprecedented level of provincial autonomy and financial independence, and permitting the development of an effective and accountable security force; cross-community trust-building and consensus-driven decision-making and financial investment in the local economy. Socio-economic grievances – including those based on poverty, isolation and unemployment – had often been taken advantage of and used as recruitment tools by AQAP. The Marib Model has had far-reaching knock-on effects, driving economic growth and development, and creating employment and educational opportunities.

It was not until 2015 that the local strategy would get teeth. In 2012, Sheik Sultan al-Aradah was appointed Governor of Marib by Yemen’s transitional President, Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Al-Aradah’s grounding within Marib’s tribal system, experience resolving tribal disputes, deep knowledge of, and commitment to, the province and military skills – seen in his role in the liberation of Marib from the Houthis in 2015 – gave him local legitimacy, has become the “backbone” of Marib’s successful development. Contrary to other leaders in Yemen, al-Aradah lives in the community he serves and is invested in Marib’s long-term development, by taking advantage of the “pre-existing tribal system”, rather than attempting to create a new political ecosystem. The community’s trust in security forces and provincial leaders has increased, the crime rate has dropped by 70 percent.

Taking advantage of the national decentralised system developed by Yemen’s National Transitional Council, al-Aradah in 2015 used Marib’s new autonomy to retain 20 percent of the province’s oil and gas revenues.[40] This secured a sustainable provincial income and enabled Marib to expand government services, pay all its employees monthly salaries, and employ some of Yemen’s most capable security officials to develop, train and run local security forces.[41] Marib’s ability to pay its employees was no small feat. From 2016 to 2018, receiving monthly wages was almost unheard of in Yemen, with the vast majority of public employees going up to two years without pay.[42] In 2020, the national Government is still struggling to pay public-sector salaries.[43]

It was not until 2015 that the local straetegy would get teeth. In 2012, Sheik Sultan al-Aradah was appointed Governor of Marib by Yemen’s transitional President, Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Al-Aradah’s grounding within Marib’s tribal system, experience resolving tribal disputes, deep knowledge of, and commitment to, the province and military skills – seen in his role in the liberation of Marib from the Houthis in 2015 – gave him local legitimacy, has become the “backbone” of Marib’s successful development. Contrary to other leaders in Yemen, al-Aradah lives in the community he serves and is invested in Marib’s long-term development, by taking advantage of the “pre-existing tribal system”, rather than attempting to create a new political ecosystem. The community’s trust in security forces and provincial leaders has increased, the crime rate has dropped by 70 percent.

Taking advantage of the national decentralised system developed by Yemen’s National Transitional Council, al-Aradah in 2015 used Marib’s new autonomy to retain 20 percent of the province’s oil and gas revenues.[40] This secured a sustainable provincial income and enabled Marib to expand government services, pay all its employees monthly salaries, and employ some of Yemen’s most capable security officials to develop, train and run local security forces. Marib’s ability to pay its employees was no small feat. From 2016 to 2018, receiving monthly wages was almost unheard of in Yemen, with the vast majority of public employees going up to two years without pay. In 2020, the national Government is still struggling to pay public-sector salaries.

The new-won provincial income allowed Marib to address other local grievances, such as poverty, unemployment, weak essential infrastructure and lack of public services. By increasing the size and number of public provincial departments and initiating essential (and less essential) infrastructure projects –  including building a hospital, a FIFA grade football ground and a university with a 5000-student capacity – Marib created a sustainable employment model. It also created educational opportunities across social sectors, including those for women. This, in turn, helped address several local socio-economic grievances.

Interviews with local citizens showed a clear trend that people felt safe inside Marib’s city walls. Its population surged from 40,000 a few years earlier, to as many as 2 million. Internally displaced peoples (IDPs) from across Yemen have sought refuge in Marib, not from AQAP, but from the civil war. With them, the new arrivals brought resources, culture and skills, setting up businesses along the city’s fast-expanding network of streets. The influx of Yemenis from more liberal parts of the country, such as Aden and Sana’a, has also had a significant impact on gender norms: this was repeated by women of all ages, from groups of teenage girls socialising in the park, to grandmothers. For the first time, women, including native Maribis, were working en masse outside the home and pursuing higher education in the province.

Conclusion

The primary grievances felt by Marib’s population at the turn of the century concerned the lack of governance, stability, security and financial opportunities. Good leadership, cross-community support and trust, consensus-seeking policymaking, and a sustainable provincial income model enabled the development of a locally-minded strategy. Furthermore, the Model has created an environment conducive to economic growth, providing a safe haven for millions of IDPs and job opportunities for young people. Unfortunately, U.S. drone strikes remain a source of fear and, in the eyes of some rural populations, are an arbitrary and unjustified exercise of deadly force. Notwithstanding Marib’s success, the US continues to conduct drone strikes and special forces raids in the province.

In fact, upon learning of Marib’s success, other towns in Yemen have attempted to adopt a similar model. Local activists saw the creation of a network of safe haven cities as a way to provide security for people facing violence across the war-ridden country. Such a model would only be possible with international support. International interventions are continually designed and executed without taking into account existing local initiatives or consulting local communities. Yet, almost without failure, local communities have devised their own responses, drawing on local expertise, and often designed with longevity and sustainability rarely seen in international responses.

By drawing on local expertise, and investing in, building on, and working with, local communities, a dynamic international response could look to address the multitude of underlying factors that drive violence and extremism. By supporting good governance, providing sustainable employment, assisting in the creation of stable avenues of funding, investing in infrastructure and promoting accountability the international community could help build community resilience, mitigate factors that may drive people to support violent extremism and contribute towards greater peace. 

Posted in Newsletter

A Newsletter despite Corona

Dear Members, sponsors and Yemen friends,

Very little, if at all, is communicated in the media regarding Yemen and, if so, only in a few lines – but FAI has news indeed:

  • All YERO children are well, the pandemic appears to be raging primarily in Aden and environment. Nevertheless, Nouria supplies all children and their families with water and soap.
  • Thanks to generous contributions from many of our members Eid alAdha could be celebrated as in former times and all present received food packages to take home.
  • A wonderful piece of news is the support of our YERO mothers on the part of the British Council in London via FAI. A new project permits financing cultural traditions in Yemen, in particular the very beautiful embroidery. The ladies involved are not only occupied in an optimal way, they earn money whereas most fathers are without a job because of the war. Kuwait and Denmark have the possibility of flying the finished products out of the country and sell them abroad – internationally promoting Yemeni tradition.
  • Furthermore, Zeitschule, the charitable organisation stationed in Munich, has once again transmitted an entirely unexpected, fairly huge sum. Nouria is in a position to not only purchase new computers, she also provides new clothing, in particular shoes, and new teaching material for all children.
  • A new organisation has been established in Vienna last week: “Apotheker ohne Grenzen”  (Pharmasists without borders), managed by one of our lady sponsors and intending to finance medicines to be purchased by Nouria in Sana´a. A relevant list of products available is being prepared. A second list will be provided by the manager of the Shelter.
  • And one more info: in the course of one of the next Sunday morning broadcasts in Ö1 Nouria will be interviewed live. You will be informed about the exact date by E Mail.
  • Last but not least: Donation requests for Yemen should be considered with utmost care: some organisations unfortunately collect money for their very own profit …

With all good wishes for the best of your summers despite the pandemic

Anisa

Posted in Newsletter

Ramadan 2020

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members, Dear Yemen Friends,

Nouria managed to arrange special Ramadan food ratios for all our children and their families despite the horrible circumstances.
With many thanks again for your contributions and kindest regards,
Anisa

Posted in Allgemein, Newsletter

Newsletter 30

Dear Sponsors, Dear Members, Dear Yemenfriends!

It would have been so very pleasant to send you a lovely Easter message as charming newsletter but not only the Corona Pandemics but also the still raging war in Yemen have jeopardised everything. Unfortunately it has, moreover, become impossible to obtain reliable news about Felix Arabia, the country is not referred to at all in the news, except for casual reports of further Saudi bombing…
I attach (in German) an article published in the German Handelsblatt, detailing how allegedly piece-loving countries export weapons. And would like to thank you very much for your generous contributions to help Nouria care for our children.

Kindest regards

Anisa

Bundesregierung genehmigt Rüstungsexporte für 1,2 Milliarden Euro an Allianz

Die Große Koalition wollte mit einem Rüstungsexportstopp ein Zeichen des Protests gegen den Jemen-Krieg setzen. Er wurde aber nur für ein Land vollständig umgesetzt
Die Bundesregierung hat seit Anfang 2019 Rüstungsexporte für mehr als eine Milliarde Euro an die Länder der Kriegsallianz genehmigt, die im Jemen gegen die Huthi-Rebellen kämpft.
Die Bundesregierung hat seit Anfang 2019 Rüstungsexporte für mehr als eine Milliarde Euro an die Länder der Kriegsallianz genehmigt, die im Jemen gegen die Huthi-Rebellen kämpft. Allein für Ägypten wurden innerhalb von knapp 15 Monaten 21 Lieferungen für 802 Millionen Euro erlaubt, für die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate (VAE) waren es 76 Einzelgenehmigungen im Wert von 257 Millionen Euro. Die Zahlen gehen aus einer Antwort des Wirtschaftsministeriums auf eine Anfrage der Linken-Abgeordneten Sevim Dagdelen hervor, die der Deutschen Presse-Agentur vorliegt.
An drei weitere Mitglieder des Bündnisses – Bahrain, Jordanien und Kuwait – gingen Exporte für zusammen 119 Millionen Euro. Die Führungsmacht Saudi-Arabien erhielt dagegen nur Geländewagen für 831.000 Euro. Das Königreich ist das einzige Land der Allianz, gegen das die Bundesregierung unter anderem wegen des Jemen-Krieges seit November 2018 einen kompletten Rüstungsexportstopp verhängt hat. Die Geländewagen waren die einzige Ausnahme, die seitdem gemacht wurde.
Union und SPD hatten sich in ihrem Koalitionsvertrag auf einen Rüstungsexportstopp für alle „unmittelbar“ am Jemen-Krieg beteiligten Staaten verständigt, der nur für Saudi-Arabien vollständig umgesetzt wurde. Die Linke fordert dagegen einen Exportstopp für alle in irgendeiner Form an dem Krieg beteiligten Staaten. „Die Bundesregierung macht sich mit ihren gigantischen Waffenlieferungen an die von Saudi-Arabien angeführte Kriegsallianz mitverantwortlich für das unermessliche Leid im Jemen“, sagte die Linken- Außenpolitikerin Dagdelen. „Das Waffenembargo gegen die Kopf-ab-Diktatur in Riad reicht lange nicht.“
Der Eingriff der von Saudi-Arabien geführten Allianz in den Bürgerkrieg im Jemen hatte sich in der vergangenen Woche zum fünften Mal gejährt. Die schiitischen Huthi-Rebellen, die vom Iran unterstützt werden, hatten 2014 den Jemen überrannt und weite Gebiete samt der Hauptstadt Sanaa unter ihre Kontrolle gebracht. Die saudische Luftwaffe kam der jemenitischen Regierung zur Hilfe und bombardierte vor allem mit Unterstützung der VAE Stellungen der Huthis.
Keine genauen Angaben zu Beteiligung am Krieg
Das Bündnis ist fünf Jahre nach Kriegseintritt allerdings brüchig. Die Emirate und der Sudan haben die meisten ihrer Truppen aus dem Bürgerkriegsland abgezogen. Auch Ägypten – mit 440.000 Mann eigentlich eines der stärksten Militärs im arabischen Raum – hat eher eine Nebenrolle: Ägyptens Marine kontrolliert vor allem die Meerenge Bab al-Mandab, die zu den weltweit wichtigsten Schifffahrtsstrecken zählt. Das Land will damit auch das angrenzende Rote Meer und den heimischen Sueskanal vor Angriffen der Huthis schützen.
Neben den genannten Mitgliedern des Bündnisses kommt Unterstützung auch noch von anderen Ländern. Pakistanische Truppen schützen in Saudi-Arabien die Grenzregion zum Jemen. Logistische Unterstützung kam zudem von Somalia und dem benachbarten Dschibuti. Der Zwergstaat am Horn von Afrika liegt nur etwa 30 Kilometer von der Küste des Jemens entfernt und hat Saudi-Arabien den Bau einer Militärbasis genehmigt.
Weder die Koalition noch die einzelnen Länder machen aber genaue Angaben dazu, in welchem Umfang sie am Jemenkrieg beteiligt sind. Die USA und Großbritannien unterstützen das Bündnis mit Geheimdienstinformationen.

Posted in Newsletter

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